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Creative and Strategic Digital Marketing

Teach A Brand To Fish: Quick Client Update


admin - November 1, 2018 - 0 comments

Earlier this year we had the pleasure of meeting Mark from MACO, an international hardware manufacturer based in Austria.

Mark asked us to take a look at the brand elements that they use to build up their marketing materials and produce several templates for their print ads.

After a meeting at their incredible UK base in Sittingbourne (Danny and Kevin are still raving about it), we set to work. Although we were providing only design and content production (not strategy on this occasion), we didn’t want to leave MACO with merely a few one-off advertisement designs, especially as the aim was to provide consistency and a standout, lasting image. Our goal was not to give a brand a fish, but to teach it to fish (so to speak). As a result, our approach was to give them a framework which they could use continually, while producing ads that would not feel too similar to each other after a few months.

We were asked not to alter the logo – so we immediately started messing with it. Testing where the red line is can be a valuable tool and make a client aware of options that they perhaps never thought about. Mark and the senior team at MACO totally got this concept and were fantastic in allowing us to experiment. One of MACO’s brand values is co-operation and they certainly demonstrated that with their trust in us.

We developed their colour palette and created design assets in keeping with their brand, including a set of icons which evoked precision, craftsmanship and creativity. We created graphic elements to frame their imagery, and ultimately this led to creating advert and editorial templates which they could use again and again. Despite our flagrant rule-breaking, MACO loved the results, and we’ve been very pleased to see our designs in print in Windows Active.

Whilst not something we would always advocate, in this case pushing the limits of the brief allowed us to open the clients’ eyes to new brand possibilities. It adds a uniqueness to their marketing material that allows them to stand out from their competition. In conclusion: it pays to teach a brand to fish, and sometimes it pays to teach them how to fish with dynamite rather than the fly-fishing they asked for.

Kevin

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