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The B's look back on more than 40 years of boundary-pushing party rock, including the songs "Rock Lobster" and "Love Shack. Since springing out of Athens, Georgia, in the mid-Seventies, the group has always been the quintessential party band. They were improbable hit-makers, scoring Top Five singles and gold and platinum plaques while waving a flag for gay pride and singing the silliest lyrics possible. Popular on Rolling Stone. Keith Strickland: Ricky and I had known each other since high school. When I met him, he had a 4-track tape recorder and had already recorded some songs just on guitar.

I must have had a few tequilas under my belt, and I sprayed around the house. So we played this party and our friends loved it. Pierson: We had to borrow the sound system. We placed it on a bookshelf.

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It was in this little house, and it shook. We wore these fake fur wigs that I found; it was this crazy pocket book made of fake fur and we turned them upside down. They were white, and made white Afros. Cindy and I wore those and we wore black and had some Barbie dolls on the ceiling. Keith wore this little red wig he dyed. We had five or six songs. They just danced so hard. The speakers were just rocking.

After day one, the killer bees invaded the Western hemisphere. And then the next gig was at an old, Jewish recreation center. It was just a bunch of college kids living there, and it retains the same vibe. So at the first few parties, Ricky and I made a backing track that we played along to.

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Strickland: So the tape had some conga, maybe some bass tones from the Farfisa organ and some second guitar; that we could play guitar with it and I played the congas. At the time, I was the mail delivery coordinator.

Ricky worked at the bus station.

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Cindy worked at the Whirly-Q luncheonette. So it was a hobby. We had to save up money to play anywhere. Strickland: We started the band just to entertain ourselves. I remember Ricky going to the library at the university and studying what he could do, like how to develop a portfolio and make a Strickland: We had some friends in Atlanta who played in a band.

So we drove up from Georgia, and it was like a hour drive. Schneider: We were paralyzed with fear, because we had never played before anybody except our friends. I think only 17 people showed up. We forgot to even ask if they wanted us back. They asked us to cut the set short. We put our stuff in the station wagon and drove straight back.

But they called us and said they wanted us back. Pierson: We blazed the path between Athens and New York for months. The place was so jammed and crowded.

Ricky drank a lot because he was very nervous and shy. He was not gonna be able to play but [after he drank] he was on fire. He played great. Strickland: So this thing was happening in New York and we were in the right place at the right time. So the labels got interested in us. He brokered the deal for us with Warner Bros. Strickland: Our manager used to play that we were shy and he would do all the talking.

We were rather quiet then. But when we get up onstage, we just go for it. Wilson: I was shy, but Ricky was even shyer, until he got to know you. I think the music helps you get out of yourself. Schneider: In the beginning Ricky would turn around onstage a lot.

The band sort of looked at me to be the frontman, so I would tell bad jokes or I started a thing where I would get the audience to do a call-and-response thing.

We became more outgoing over time. Plus, we smoked pot [ laughs ]. That might have made us a little paranoid. Schneider: Saturday Night Live was nerve-racking. I was so sick to my stomach, but it went really well, and it put our record back on the charts. Eventually, it went platinum. Wilson: When Ricky passed [in ], it was just a horrible time. It was like an atom bomb going off. I think Keith dealt with the shock by doing music every day. That was his way of getting over his depression.

Strickland: After about two years, I told Cindy and Kate I had some music I had been working on and played it for them and then we started discussing the potential of working together again.

Wilson: We got a rehearsal space in Manhattan in the Wall Street area. We were very serious about it. We would work for four days a week, and it came together pretty quickly. It was all about nostalgia. It was looking back at the good times we used to have in Athens, so it was a wonderful, healing record. Pierson: Keith would write the instrumentation and we would jam on that.

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Strickland: It took about a year to write Cosmic Thing. We spent a lot of time just talking, and we needed that. Wilson: It turned out to be such a healing thing to get back together again. It felt like Ricky was in the room. It was an African-American club that had a lot of good shows. Wilson: It used to be this funky building with a tin roof that was old and rusty. They would have Soul Train lines. We had already decided we were going to work with Nile Rodgers and Don Was.

We love it. Just repeat this one part. Pierson: That Motown feel really made it a party anthem, a regular hit at all your weddings and bar mitzvahs. Strickland: Another funny thing is we were recording the song at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, and there was a big electrical storm outside, and all the electricity went out. So we just picked it up right there and took the rest from a second tape. That song is all live except for one splice. Thank God for college radio. Strickland: There was something magical about that album, how it all came together.

We sequenced it in a way that we felt told a story. Our feeling was if it sounds good, it is good. So we put that freedom into writing. We felt like we could do anything. Pierson: The inspiration for our vocal harmonies was sort of Appalachian. It's sort of at weird intervals and it almost has an Appalachian kind of feel to it. The harmonies were really spontaneous. And the way we jammed, we would just get into a trance. Almost like automatic writing, this collective unconscious would take over and sometimes we'd be singing all at once.

We'd listen back to the tape and seek out the best parts and patch them together in a collage. I might be doing the high part and Cindy does the low part, but then we would switch. On "Roam," we crossed over in the highs and lows. Cindy Wilson: Ricky and I were living together at one point after he came back from hitchhiking all around Europe.

We were working at a luncheonette counter [ laughs ]. I came to work one day, and Ricky was playing music on his guitar, just snickering. He played me the riff that turned out to be "Rock Lobster," and it was hilarious. He was just trying to be funny. His guitar style made it moodier and it really is a driving song, but it does have that funny humor to it. Schneider: I went to this disco in Atlanta called the Disco.

Instead of a light show, they had pictures of puppies, babies, hamburgers and lobsters on a grill. And I thought, "Rock Lobster," that's a good idea for a song and probably no one else would. The lyrics got weirder and weirder. I used to live on the Jersey shore, because I'm from New Jersey, so you would constantly hear "Pass the butter, please" on the radio, which was tanning butter [ laughs ].

I would do that and the gals came up with those wild fish noises.

Jun 01,   The B's look back on more than 40 years of boundary-pushing party rock, including the songs "Rock Lobster" and "Love Shack." Love Shacks, Rock Lobsters and Nude . Nov 23,   Review. It's not that hard to say goodbye to yesterday when saying goodbye is all about getting hard! That's the task of the dysfunctional band of porn stars who get back together for one last elegiac shoot in Love Shack . Their legendary producer has gone the wrong kind of stiff, and in his memory they're out to make the bluest of blue flicks. Jun 01,   Love Shacks, Rock Lobsters and Nude Parties: The B's in Their Own Words The quintessential party rockers reflect on more than four decades of .

Cindy let loose with her tribute to Yoko. Wilson: We tried to have these song paintings. It took a lot of work and a lot of rehearsal, because we weren't reading music. It was very intricate. There were a lot of stops and starts and changes and weird harmonies that we came up with. When we do the shows, it sounds like we're just having fun, but it really is labor intensive.

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Strickland: We'd listen back and pick out different vocal parts for Kate and Cindy, and the lyrics they were singing. Ricky and I would write the music, and then Fred, Kate and Cindy would jam on top if it and we would record it.

Then we'd piece it together. Schneider: We would jam for hours. It would sometimes take a month or two to come up with a song. We'd record everything on reel, and Kate and Ricky would take them home and go through it and pick out parts. That's why "Rock Lobster" was originally six minutes and 47 seconds long. Pierson: I remember being in the house me and Cindy had rented in Athens and working on that song and "Planet Claire" and just jamming on fish sounds.

Little did we know that the song would have the life and spark it had. That's one of my favorite songs to perform, because we can still experiment. We can still jam on it live. It's very spontaneous. Strickland: Fred told his friend, Julia, that we had a band - and we didn't really have a band yet - but she was having a Valentine's Day party, and she said we could play at her party.

Pierson: There weren't really places to play in Athens, so we had to play a party. There was a folk club, and it was kind of hippie music. The clubs were just emerging. We were just sort of an aloof group of artistically oriented friends, and we would crash parties together and drink beer and dance really crazy.

We'd usually drive people off the dance floor [ laughs ]. Strickland: There were a lot of really wild parties in Athens when we first started.

Wilson: Athens used to hold a record for streaking back in the Seventies. It was craziness. Strickland: The wildest party I remember was where a friend of ours had one in his basement apartment and put about a foot or maybe half a foot of popcorn on the floor. It was really dark, and he put black plastic on all the walls and there was a black light.

I remember at one point, everybody got naked and put oil on their bodies and rolling around in the popcorn [ laughs ]. It was just naked, oily bodies and popcorn listening to Captain Beefheart. A friend of ours was a filmmaker and filmed everything.

Pierson: I remember one time where people were streaking. Our friend came to the party wearing nothing but a barrel. She was naked, but had a barrel around her and our friend Jeremy came to present her, and he had a cape on. I got a garden hose and took it into the house. I must have had a few tequilas under my belt, and I sprayed around the house. It was a rental, but I don't think it did too much damage.

So we played this party and our friends loved it. We had so few songs that when we were done, they said, "Well, play them again. We thought it's pretty good if our friends liked it, because they'd be the first to say, "You suck. Pierson: We had to borrow the sound system. We placed it on a bookshelf. It was in this little house, and it shook. We wore these fake fur wigs that I found; it was this crazy pocket book made of fake fur and we turned them upside down.

They were white, and made white Afros. Cindy and I wore those and we wore black and had some Barbie dolls on the ceiling. Keith wore this little red wig he dyed. We had five or six songs. They just danced so hard. The speakers were just rocking. Schneider: At the time, we had a song called "Killer Bees," because killer bees had just arrived in South America. After day one, the killer bees invaded the Western hemisphere.

And then the next gig was at an old, Jewish recreation center. The third party we did was on top of a table at a friend's house. Wilson: I'm now living across from the second party we played, in this big house. It was just a bunch of college kids living there, and it retains the same vibe. Strickland: Kate wasn't really playing keyboard yet. So at the first few parties, Ricky and I made a backing track that we played along to.

Pierson: We recorded it on reel to reel. Strickland: So the tape had some conga, maybe some bass tones from the Farfisa organ and some second guitar; that we could play guitar with it and I played the congas. I wasn't even playing drums.

Schneider: We all had jobs we didn't like in the beginning. At the time, I was the mail delivery coordinator. Ricky worked at the bus station. Cindy worked at the Whirly-Q luncheonette. Kate worked at a local rag [the Athens Banner Herald ]. So it was a hobby. We had to save up money to play anywhere.

Strickland: We started the band just to entertain ourselves. We weren't thinking of having a career 40 years later. I remember Ricky going to the library at the university and studying what he could do, like how to develop a portfolio and make a Strickland: We had some friends in Atlanta who played in a band. So we drove up from Georgia, and it was like a hour drive.

We had this car we called Croydon, Cindy and Ricky's parents' station wagon. We'd stopped playing along with the tape by then. Schneider: We were paralyzed with fear, because we had never played before anybody except our friends. I think only 17 people showed up. The curtain didn't open, so I had to throw it open and all the other bands were dressed in black and we were like a rainbow congregation.

We forgot to even ask if they wanted us back.

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Pierson: On the first night, we didn't have many songs. We didn't realize it was kind of an audition night, and there were a lot of other bands on the bill.

They asked us to cut the set short.

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We drove all the way from Georgia, and they said, "Can you play a couple of songs? We put our stuff in the station wagon and drove straight back. But they called us and said they wanted us back. We didn't really consider ourselves punk, but we knew that we were going to be a part of that.

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We didn't really call ourselves "New Wave. Pierson: We blazed the path between Athens and New York for months. Each time we'd come back, we'd write more songs, rehearse like crazy and go back up.

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I remember at the Loft, there was a huge line outside and Ricky looked out the window and said, "What's that line out there? The place was so jammed and crowded. Ricky drank a lot because he was very nervous and shy. He was not gonna be able to play but [after he drank] he was on fire. He played great. Strickland: So this thing was happening in New York and we were in the right place at the right time.

A friend of ours, Danny Beard, created a label called DB Recs and we recorded our first single for him - "Rock Lobster" and the B side was "52 Girls" - and that sold really well, like 20, copies. So the labels got interested in us. Pierson: We'd had a friend, who was our first manager, and she started getting offers from Red Star Records, and Virgin and Warner Bros.

And she said, "Y'all, I don't know what to do. He brokered the deal for us with Warner Bros. Strickland: Our manager used to play that we were shy and he would do all the talking. We were rather quiet then. We're all introverts except for Kate; Fred sometimes can be very shy. But when we get up onstage, we just go for it. Wilson: I was shy, but Ricky was even shyer, until he got to know you. I think the music helps you get out of yourself. Schneider: In the beginning Ricky would turn around onstage a lot.

The band sort of looked at me to be the frontman, so I would tell bad jokes or I started a thing where I would get the audience to do a call-and-response thing.

We became more outgoing over time. Plus, we smoked pot [ laughs ]. That might have made us a little paranoid. Pierson: We probably kept our mouths shut because we didn't really know the music business.

We thought, "It's better to just not say much.

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